700 N Fairfield Rd Suite C
Layton, UT 84041
(801) 889-1044

Posts for: June, 2017

By 4 Dental Health
June 23, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental bonding  

With the help of our dentist in Layton, UT, Dr. Steven Christensen, dental bonding can help restore your smile today. This simple and dental bondingaffordable method to fix minor imperfections for patients of all ages improves the smile with ease. All our dentist to examine your teeth thoroughly before deciding whether or not dental bonding is a viable treatment option for you and your oral health.

About Dental Bonding

With dental bonding, our Layton dentist uses composite resin to make improvements on the surface of the teeth. This material adds strength to weakened teeth. It bonds directly to the tooth’s surface being treated. After bonding is complete, the material is invisible to the eye. The bonding process takes less time than other procedures such as veneers whose goal is similar. It also doesn’t require multiple visits to our dental office. Dr. Christensen can repair your teeth and smile in just one visit.

Dental bonding can be used to repair broken teeth, chips or other damage overall on patients of all ages. Before the bonding procedure begins, the surface of the teeth is cleaned and etched with a gel that opens the pores allowing the bonding material to work better. This gel is rinsed off before the composite resin material is painted on in thin layers. A curing light is used to harden the material. The tooth or teeth being treated are polished after bonding is complete.

When it comes to caring for your teeth, bonded teeth should be brushed and flossed just as often. Dr. Christensen recommends at least twice a day brushing with fluoride toothpaste and daily flossing. These teeth will look natural and stay strong for years to come with the proper oral hygiene routine.

To schedule an appointment with our Layton, UT dentist, Dr. Christensen, today to discuss what dental bonding can do for you, call 801-889-1044.


By 4 Dental Health
June 21, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   shingles  
BesidesYourHealthShinglesCouldAffectYourDentalCare

If you had chicken pox as a child, you're at higher risk for a painful viral infection later in life called shingles. Besides a painful skin rash and other symptoms that can develop, shingles could also affect your dental care.

About 90% of children contract chicken pox, a disease caused by the varicella zoster virus (VZV), which usually clears up on its own. But later in life, usually after age 50, about a quarter to a third of chicken pox patients will develop shingles.

The onset of shingles usually produces an itching or burning sensation on the skin that's either numb or overly sensitive to the touch. A red rash may ensue with crusty lesions, accompanied sometimes by pain, fever and fatigue. The rash often forms a belt-like or striped pattern along one side of the face or body.

For most patients this painful rash is the extent of their symptoms. But women who are pregnant, patients undergoing cancer treatment or people with compromised immune systems are at risk for more serious complications if they contract the disease. It's important for these at-risk patients to obtain a vaccination, as well as avoid contact with anyone with shingles.

Which brings us to your dental care: in its early stages shingles can be contagious, the virus passing to others through skin contact or by airborne respiratory secretions. That's why it's important if you're currently experiencing a shingles episode that you let us know before undergoing any kind of dental work.  Even a routine teeth cleaning with an ultrasonic device could disrupt the virus and increase the chances of it spreading to someone else. We may need to postpone dental work until the virus is under control.

Antiviral drugs like acyclovir or famciclovir are highly effective in bringing the disease under control, especially if treatment starts within three days of the onset of symptoms. And don't forget the shingles vaccination: the U.S. Center for Disease Control recommends it for anyone 60 or older regardless of a past history with chicken pox.

See your physician as soon as possible if you begin to notice symptoms. Don't let shingles interfere with your life — or your dental care.

If you would like more information on the impact of shingles and similar viruses on dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By 4 Dental Health
June 06, 2017
Category: Oral Health
InTodaysNFLOralHygieneTakesCenterStage

Everyone knows that in the game of football, quarterbacks are looked up to as team leaders. That's why we're so pleased to see some NFL QB's setting great examples of… wait for it… excellent oral hygiene.

First, at the 2016 season opener against the Broncos, Cam Newton of the Carolina Panthers was spotted on the bench; in his hands was a strand of dental floss. In between plays, the 2105 MVP was observed giving his hard-to-reach tooth surfaces a good cleaning with the floss.

Later, Buffalo Bills QB Tyrod Taylor was seen on the sideline of a game against the 49ers — with a bottle of mouthwash. Taylor took a swig, swished it around his mouth for a minute, and spit it out. Was he trying to make his breath fresher in the huddle when he called out plays?

Maybe… but in fact, a good mouthrinse can be much more than a short-lived breath freshener.

Cosmetic rinses can leave your breath with a minty taste or pleasant smell — but the sensation is only temporary. And while there's nothing wrong with having good-smelling breath, using a cosmetic mouthwash doesn't improve your oral hygiene — in fact, it can actually mask odors that may indicate a problem, such as tooth decay or gum disease.

Using a therapeutic mouthrinse, however, can actually enhance your oral health. Many commonly available therapeutic rinses contain anti-cariogenic (cavity-fighting) ingredients, such as fluoride; these can help prevent tooth decay and cavity formation by strengthening tooth enamel. Others contain antibacterial ingredients; these can help control the harmful oral bacteria found in plaque — the sticky film that can build up on your teeth in between cleanings. Some antibacterial mouthrinses are available over-the-counter, while others are prescription-only. When used along with brushing and flossing, they can reduce gum disease (gingivitis) and promote good oral health.

So why did Taylor rinse? His coach Rex Ryan later explained that he was cleaning out his mouth after a hard hit, which may have caused some bleeding. Ryan also noted, “He [Taylor] does have the best smelling breath in the league for any quarterback.” The coach didn't explain how he knows that — but never mind. The takeaway is that a cosmetic rinse may be OK for a quick fix — but when it comes to good oral hygiene, using a therapeutic mouthrinse as a part of your daily routine (along with flossing and brushing) can really step up your game.

If you would like more information about mouthrinses and oral hygiene, contact us or schedule a consultation.




Contact Us

4 Dental Health

700 N Fairfield Rd Suite C
Layton, UT 84041