700 N Fairfield Rd Suite C
Layton, UT 84041
(801) 889-1044

Posts for: December, 2018

By 4 Dental Health
December 27, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
J-LosUnluckyBreakChippingaToothonStage

Whether she’s singing, dancing or acting, Jennifer Lopez is a performer who is known for giving it all she’s got. But during one show, Lopez recently admitted, she gave a bit more then she had planned.

“I chipped my tooth on stage,” she told interviewers from Entertainment Tonight, “and had to finish the show….I went back thinking ‘Can I finish the show like this?’”

With that unlucky break, J-Lo joins a growing list of superstar singers—including Taylor Swift and Michael Buble—who have something in common: All have chipped their teeth on microphones while giving a performance.

But it’s not just celebs who have accidental dental trouble. Chips are among the most common dental injuries—and the front teeth, due to their position, are particularly susceptible. Unfortunately, they are also the most visible. But there are also a number of good ways to repair chipped, cracked or broken teeth short of replacing them.

For minor to moderate chips, cosmetic bonding might be recommended. In this method, special high-tech resins, in shades that match your natural teeth, are applied to the tooth’s surface. Layers of resin, cured with a special light, will often restore the tooth to good appearance. Best of all, the whole process can often be done in just one visit to the dental office, and the results can last for several years.

For a more permanent repair—or if the damage is more extensive—dental veneers may be another option. Veneers are wafer-thin shells that cover the entire front surface of one or more teeth. Strong, durable and natural-looking, they can be used to repair moderate chips, cracks or irregularities. They can also help you get a “red-carpet” smile: brilliant white teeth with perfectly even spacing. That’s why veneers are so popular among Hollywood celebs—even those who haven’t chipped their teeth!

Fortunately, even if the tooth is extensively damaged, it’s usually possible to restore it with a crown (cap), a bridge—or a dental implant, today’s gold standard for whole-tooth replacement. But in many cases, a less complex type of restoration will do the trick.

Which tooth restoration method did J-Lo choose? She didn’t say—but luckily for her adoring fans, after the microphone mishap she went right back up on stage and finished the show.

If you have a chipped tooth but you need to make the show go on, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Artistic Repair of Chipped Teeth With Composite Resin” and “Porcelain Veneers.”


By 4 Dental Health
December 24, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

Dental ImplantsWhile losing a tooth impacts your smile's functionality and appearance, you do have a great option to replace it. A dental implant from 4 Dental Health in Layton, UT restores normal appearance, biting, chewing and speech. Also, this artificial tooth improves jaw bone density. Learn more about dental implants from your experienced dentist, Dr. Steven Christensen.

What happens when you lose a tooth?

Besides creating an embarrassing smile gap, losing one or more teeth impacts your oral health. Remaining teeth actually weaken as they drift into the empty space. Supporting gum tissue and bone begin to recede almost immediately. In fact, a full 25 percent or more of bone density degrades within the first year after a tooth is lost to infection, decay, gum disease or oral injury.

In addition, when more teeth or even all teeth are lost, facial appearance ages dramatically, and edentulous people do not eat well or speak clearly. While conventional dentures and bridgework help restore smile aesthetics, they do not repair the loss of bone or soft tissue because these prosthetics only set on top of the gums.

The benefits of dental implants

A dental implant is today's best artificial tooth. It has three parts: a titanium root which resides in the jaw under the gums, a metal alloy abutment (extension post) and true to life dental crown crafted from resilient and color-matched porcelain.

Dental implants adhere to the jaw bone, creating an excellent foundation for the exposed portions of the artificial tooth. In fact, they improve the density, size and width of the supporting bone through a miraculous process dentists call osseointegration.

Other benefits of dental implants are:

  • A comfortable oral surgery and restoration process
  • The versatility of use (implants can support fixed bridgework and even full dentures)
  • Biocompatibility (rejection or allergic reactions are very rare)
  • Amazingly natural appearance
  • Longevity (a decades-long lifespan)

Dental implant care

As dental implants are not real teeth, they cannot get cavities. However, gum tissue and underlying bone can develop gum disease--peri-implantitis--if you do not carefully brush and floss every day and get your semi-annual hygienic cleanings (and exams) with Dr. Christensen.

Peri-implantitis causes inflammation at the implant site and also mobility of the implant itself, reports the Dental Research Journal. Tobacco usage encourages this devastating infection, too; so getting an implant may be the best time to quit smoking.

Learn more

If you're interested in the many benefits of dental implants, contact Dr. Steven Christensen today at 4 Dental Health in Layton, UT and arrange your personal consultation. Call (801) 889-1044 to speak with a friendly team member.

3ThingsYouMightNoticewithYourChildsTeethThatNeedaDentist

Dental disease doesn’t discriminate by age. Although certain types of disease are more common in adults, children are just as susceptible, particularly to tooth decay.

Unfortunately, the early signs of disease in a child’s teeth can be quite subtle—that’s why you as a parent should keep alert for any signs of a problem. Here are 3 things you might notice that definitely need your dentist’s attention.

Cavities. Tooth decay occurs when mouth acid erodes tooth enamel and forms holes or cavities. The infection can continue to grow and affect deeper parts of the tooth like the pulp and root canals, eventually endangering the tooth’s survival. If you notice tiny brown spots on their teeth, this may indicate the presence of cavities—you should see your dentist as soon as possible. To account for what you don’t see, have your child visit your dentist at least twice a year for cleanings and checkups.

Toothache. Tooth pain can range from a sensitive twinge of pain when eating or drinking hot or cold foods to a throbbing sharp pain. Whatever its form, a child’s toothache might indicate advancing decay in which the infection has entered the tooth pulp and is attacking the nerves. If your child experiences any form of toothache, see your dentist the next day if possible. Even if the pain goes away, don’t cancel the appointment—it’s probable the infection is still there and growing.

Bleeding gums. Gums don’t normally bleed during teeth brushing—the gums are much more resilient unless they’ve been weakened by periodontal (gum) disease (although over-aggressive brushing could also be a cause).  If you notice your child’s gums bleeding after brushing, see your dentist as soon as possible—the sooner they receive treatment for any gum problems the less damage they’ll experience, and the better chance of preserving any affected teeth.

If you would like more information on dental care for your child, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By 4 Dental Health
December 07, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease   smoking  
StopSmokingtoReduceYourRiskofGumDisease

Your risk for periodontal (gum) disease increases if you’re not brushing or flossing effectively. You can also have a higher risk if you’ve inherited thinner gum tissues from your parents. But there’s one other risk factor for gum disease that’s just as significant: if you have a smoking habit.

According to research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), a little more than sixty percent of smokers develop gum disease in their lifetime at double the risk of non-smokers. And it’s not just cigarettes—any form of tobacco use (including smokeless) or even e-cigarettes increases the risk for gum disease.

Smoking alters the oral environment to make it friendlier for disease-causing bacteria. Some chemicals released in tobacco can damage gum tissues, which can cause them to gradually detach from the teeth. This can lead to tooth loss, which smokers are three times more likely to experience than non-smokers.

Smoking may also hide the early signs of gum disease like red, swollen or bleeding gums. But because the nicotine in tobacco restricts the blood supply to gum tissue, the gums of a smoker with gum disease may look healthy. But it’s a camouflage, which could delay prompt treatment that could prevent further damage.

Finally because tobacco can inhibit the body’s production of antibodies to fight infection, smoking may slow the healing process after gum disease treatment.  This also means tobacco users have a higher risk of a repeat infection, something known as refractory periodontitis. This can create a cycle of treatment and re-infection that can significantly increase dental care costs.

It doesn’t have to be this way. You can substantially lower your risk of gum disease and its complications by quitting any kind of tobacco habit. As it leaves your system, your body will respond much quicker to heal itself. And quitting will definitely increase your chances of preventing gum disease in the first place.

Quitting, though, can be difficult, so it’s best not to go it alone. Talk with your doctor about ways to kick the habit; you may also benefit from the encouragement of family and friends, as well as support groups of others trying to quit too. To learn more about quitting tobacco visit www.smokefree.gov or call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

If you would like more information on how smoking can affect your oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Smoking and Gum Disease.”




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4 Dental Health

700 N Fairfield Rd Suite C
Layton, UT 84041