700 N Fairfield Rd Suite C
Layton, UT 84041
(801) 889-1044

Posts for tag: toothache

3ThingsYouMightNoticewithYourChildsTeethThatNeedaDentist

Dental disease doesn’t discriminate by age. Although certain types of disease are more common in adults, children are just as susceptible, particularly to tooth decay.

Unfortunately, the early signs of disease in a child’s teeth can be quite subtle—that’s why you as a parent should keep alert for any signs of a problem. Here are 3 things you might notice that definitely need your dentist’s attention.

Cavities. Tooth decay occurs when mouth acid erodes tooth enamel and forms holes or cavities. The infection can continue to grow and affect deeper parts of the tooth like the pulp and root canals, eventually endangering the tooth’s survival. If you notice tiny brown spots on their teeth, this may indicate the presence of cavities—you should see your dentist as soon as possible. To account for what you don’t see, have your child visit your dentist at least twice a year for cleanings and checkups.

Toothache. Tooth pain can range from a sensitive twinge of pain when eating or drinking hot or cold foods to a throbbing sharp pain. Whatever its form, a child’s toothache might indicate advancing decay in which the infection has entered the tooth pulp and is attacking the nerves. If your child experiences any form of toothache, see your dentist the next day if possible. Even if the pain goes away, don’t cancel the appointment—it’s probable the infection is still there and growing.

Bleeding gums. Gums don’t normally bleed during teeth brushing—the gums are much more resilient unless they’ve been weakened by periodontal (gum) disease (although over-aggressive brushing could also be a cause).  If you notice your child’s gums bleeding after brushing, see your dentist as soon as possible—the sooner they receive treatment for any gum problems the less damage they’ll experience, and the better chance of preserving any affected teeth.

If you would like more information on dental care for your child, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

FollowTheseCommonSenseStepsWhenYourChildhasaToothache

A child's toothache is no fun for either the child or the parent. But if you're faced with this situation, don't panic — unless they have a fever or you notice facial swelling, it's unlikely an emergency.

 Instead, take the following steps:

Find out where it hurts and for how long. Tooth pain can stem from a lot of causes, including decay or a localized area of infection called an abscess. See if your child can tell you if it's coming from one particular tooth or from a general area. Although children can't always judge how long they've hurt, try to get a general idea so you'll know if you need to call us sooner rather than later.

Look for problem signs in the mouth. As you look where they say it hurts, see if you can see brown spots or cavities on any teeth — this would indicate tooth decay. Look also at the gums or inner areas of the mouth for sores or swelling. Unless they've had an injury, this could indicate an abscess.

Try to dislodge any food shards between teeth. It's also possible the pain is coming from a piece of hard food like a popcorn kernel wedged between their teeth. Help them gently floss between the teeth to see if you can dislodge any.

Try to ease the pain. Although you may not need to see us immediately, your child's mouth still aches. You can help relieve it temporarily with a child's dose of ibuprofen or acetaminophen. You can also apply an ice pack to the outside cheek for swelling, but don't apply the ice directly to the skin, which can burn it. And don't rub aspirin or other pain relievers on the gums — they're acidic and can irritate soft tissue.

See us for a full examination. It's wise to have any tooth pain checked — the question is often how soon. You should see us the same day or first thing in the morning if the pain has persisted for more than a day or night, pain relievers haven't eased the pain or they have fever or facial swelling. If the pain is short-lived you can usually wait until the next day — but do get it checked out.

If you would like more information on treating your child's toothache, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Child's Toothache.”

By 4 Dental Health
September 27, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: toothache   tooth pain   Tooth Decay  

Cavities are generally the most common cause of a toothache. However, there are different types of tooth pain, and other dental toothacheproblems like tooth sensitivity, a cracked or chipped tooth, or an infection may also be at the root of persistent pain or throbbing in a tooth. Because a thorough dental exam is usually necessary to determine what is causing a toothache, the dentists at Layton, UT-based 4Dentalhealth advise patients to schedule an appointment for persistent tooth pain in order to get the appropriate treatment and to avoid potentially serious complications in the future.

Emergency Dentistry in the Layton, UT

In general, pain is considered a dental emergency, and should be examined by a dentist as soon as possible. If a tooth is chipped or broken as the result of an accident, bacteria can accumulate in the space that holds the nerves, blood vessels, and pulp inside the tooth, which can lead to painful infections and potential permanent damage and even tooth loss. An emergency root canal may be necessary, depending on the damage, in order to save the tooth.

Other Sources of Tooth Pain

Another common cause of tooth pain is sensitivity, which is sometimes a symptom of a cavity. Sensitivity causes numbing and sharp pain when the teeth come into contact with hot or cold food and beverages. In addition to cavities, gum recession and wearing down of the enamel can cause sensitivity. A dental exam can help to determine the cause of tooth sensitivity.

In some cases, pain can be a sign of a broken or cracked crown or dental filling that needs to be replaced. Conditions like temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and sinusitis cause pain that can be mistaken for pain in a tooth or the jaw.

Find a Dentist in Layton, UT

If you are suffering from a persistent toothache, contact 4Dentalhealth by calling (801) 889-1044 to schedule an appointment with a dentist today.

By 4 Dental Health
September 26, 2012
Category: Oral Health
Tags: toothache   tooth pain  
TestingyourKnowledgeonToothPain

When it comes to tooth pain, it is important to identify two things: what is causing your pain and what can be done about it. In some instances you can handle it yourself at home; however, for others, you should contact us so that we can diagnose and treat the problem. See how much you really know about tooth pain by taking our true/false test.

  1. It is perfectly normal to experience tooth sensitivity to hot and cold foods for a few days after dental treatment.
    True or False
  2. If you experience sharp pain when biting down on foods, you should hold off on contacting us to see if the pain gets better on it own.
    True or False
  3. Tooth pain is caused by a reaction of nerves inside the tooth's enamel with the severity of the pain dependant upon the type and degree of the stimulus.
    True or False
  4. Generally speaking, pain is a protective response that ranges from minor to severe as a way of informing the body that something is wrong.
    True or False
  5. If a tooth's root surface is sensitive, you should use a firm toothbrush to ensure that you are keeping the area clean by thoroughly removing dental bacterial plaque.
    True or False
  6. Lingering pain after eating hot or cold foods and liquids probably means that the pulp within your tooth is probably damaged or inflamed as a result of deep tooth decay or injury from a physical trauma.
    True or False
  7. Regarding tooth sensitivity, you should only contact us if the pain persists for several months because this is not likely to be anything serious.
    True or False
  8. If a tooth's pulp becomes damaged or dies, you will need a root canal.
    True or False
  9. With tooth pain, knowing how long to wait before you contact us can save physical, financial and emotional stress.
    True or False
  10. People often confuse tooth and sinus pain because they both can feel the same — a dull ache with pressure in the upper teeth and sinus area on one or both sides of the face.
    True or False

Answers: 1) True. 2) False. You should contact us asap for an examination before the pain worsens. 3) False. The nerves are located in the tooth's pulp chamber. 4) True. 5) False. Use a soft bristled toothbrush not a firm one. 6) True. 7) False. While tooth sensitivity generally does not signal a serious issue, if it persist for days or worsens, contact us. 8) True. 9) False. Early interception is best. 10) True.

To learn more, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Pain? Don't Wait!” Or contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions.



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4 Dental Health

700 N Fairfield Rd Suite C
Layton, UT 84041